Framework for Reaction to Place

Camouflage Tips (01-24-20)

Only a few designers actually develop camouflage, but learning more about camouflage generally has the potential to be handy in a number of situations/settings.  Smart, Cuthill and Scott-Samuel report in a study (done with human participants) published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B that “movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators. . . . Ioan Smart . . .  lead author, said: ‘Our research has shown. . . .

Emotions and Assessments (01-23-20)

Gerger and colleagues studied how being exposed to images with more positive or more negative content influences aesthetic assessments.  They “presented emotion primes . . . consisting of either emotional faces or scenes, further subdivided in disgusting, fearful, neutral, or positive emotional content and tested how liking, valence, and arousal ratings of abstract patterns were affected. . . .  primes influenced ratings in an emotion congruent manner in both faces and emotional scenes.

Job Control and Back Pain (01-22-20)

Buruck lead a team that linked job control and chronic lower back pain (CLBP). Job control was described as including decision authority and skill discretion; it is reasonable to tie this definition to comfortable levels of control over the physical work environment, choices of where to work, and similar factors.  Buruck and colleagues learned via a literature review and meta-analysis that “CLBP was significantly positively related to workload . . . and significantly negatively related to overall job control . . . decision authority . . .  and two measures of social support. . .

Colors FOR Nature (01-21-20)

Fondren, Swierk, and Putman investigated links between the colors we wear and how animals who see those colors behave;  expanding the Fondren lead team’s findings to colors used among animals generally seems plausible.  The research trio “tested whether human clothing color affects water anole [lizards] (Anolis aquaticus) behavior at a popular ecotourism destination in Costa Rica. . . .We examined whether clothing resembling the primary signaling color (orange) of water anoles increases number of anole sightings and ease of capture. Research teams . .

Emotional Responses to Music (01-10-20)

Research by Cowen, Keltner, Fang, and Sauter indicates that there are 13 consistent emotional responses to music; future research, indicating if these findings can be generalized to experiences beyond hearing music, will be useful. Researchers “surveyed more than 2,500 people in the United States and China about their emotional responses to . . . songs from genres including rock, folk, jazz, classical, marching band, experimental and heavy metal.The upshot?

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