Healthcare

Moving Nature (10-24-17)

Zijlstra and colleagues probed the effects of seeing images of moving nature on patient anxiety levels.  The team “investigated whether the use of motion nature projection in computed tomography (CT) imaging rooms is effective in mitigating psycho-physiological anxiety (vs. no intervention). . . . motion nature projection had a negative indirect effect on perceived anxiety through a higher level of perceived pleasantness of the room [when motion was present, anxiety was lower and the room was perceived to be more pleasant]. . . .

Environmental Control for Younger Patients (10-20-17)

Trzpuc and her team investigated factors that contribute to the wellbeing of patients in child-adolescent mental health units.  During a study completed at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital Child–Adolescent Mental Health Inpatient Unit they found via patient surveys that  design features in which patients have choice and control offer greater perceptions of calm during their stay in the unit [i.e., patients perceived they were calmer when these opportunities for choice and control were present].”  Data were collected in two areas, one of which had bee

Brighter Art Preferred in Healthcare Facilities (07-31-17)

Nielsen and Mullins collected information from hospitalized patients about their preferences for art in healthcare facilities.  The team found that “the presence of coloured visual art in hospitals contributes to health outcomes by improving patients’ wellbeing and satisfaction. . . . . Overall, patients preferred art in brighter colours. . . .  patients experienced more positive memories and emotions if they perceived the colours of the art as brighter. . . .

Healthcare Employees: Visibility and Performance (07-28-17)

Two studies presented at the 2017 meeting of the Environmental Design Research Association link more visual contact between health care workers and enhanced employee performance.  Gharaveis and his team found that “with high visibility in emergency departments, teamwork and collaborative communication will be improved, while the frequency of security issues will be reduced. . . .

Hospital Art Preferences (07-05-17)

Nielsen and her team investigated the sorts of art preferred by hospital patients.  They determined that patients “primarily ranked items to favor figurative art painted in light colors.”

Stine Nielsen, Michael Mullins, Lars Fich, and Kirsten Roessler.  2017.  “The Significance of Certain Elements in Art for Patients’ Experience and Use.”  Visual Anthropology, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 310-327.

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