Increase Productivity/Performance

Workplace Rudeness (11-02-17)

It is important to design workplaces that reduce the likelihood of rude behavior, for more than the obvious reasons.  It is particularly important to smooth interactions that might occur during morning hours, for example as people arrive or get early cups of coffee.  The Woolum team found that if employees are relatively less confident and emotionally stable “a single exposure to [witnessed, i.e., visually observed] rudeness in the morning can contaminate employees’ perceptions of subsequent social interactions leading them to perceive greater workplace rudeness throughout their workday. .

Nearby Nature Needed (10-25-17)

Dadvand and his large team have gathered additional evidence indicating how important it is that people have ready access to green spaces.  They “evaluated the association between lifelong residential exposure [at locations where study participants had lived since they were born] to green space and attention during preschool and early primary school years. . . .

Space Plants (10-16-17)

Research indicates that plants can enhance our wellbeing, even when we’re in space.  Space travel can be stressful, it “can cause sleep disorders, a reduction in energy, inattentiveness and difficulty in problem-solving, and even memory loss. It can cause people to be more hostile, act more impulsively and, despite the danger and excitement, is sometimes boring. Any of these conditions and problems can lead to dangerous, if not tragic outcomes.” Odeh and Guy completed  “a review of the existing literature on plant-people interactions. . . . .

Sound Management Tool (10-13-17)

The National Research Council of Canada, Construction Division, has released a new edition of their Guide to Calculating Airborne Sound Transmission in Buildings.  A copy is available free at the web address noted below.  The introduction to the Guide reports that “The International Standards Organization (ISO) has published a calculation method, ISO 15712-1 that uses laboratory test data for sub-assemblies such as walls and floors as inputs for a detailed procedure to calculate the expected sound transmission between adjacent rooms. . . .

Standing and Thinking (10-06-17)

Rosenbaum and his colleagues evaluated how our mental performance is influenced by whether we are standing or sitting – their findings have added importance as people are being urged to spend more time standing and changing positions.  The team found that people standing have more cognitive control and that their selective attention systems function more effectively than people who are sitting.  Selective attention is our ability to react to stimuli of particular concern to us when we’re experiencing several different stimuli simultaneously.  In more technical terms: “we examined . . .

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