design research

Paper Vs. Electronic Requests (03-21-22)

A recent study indicates that we respond differently to material presented on paper than on digital devices.  Allen shares that “research by Maferima Toure-Tillery  [co-author Lili Wang]. . . finds that people are more likely to engage in virtuous behavior when they make their selections on paper than when they are using a digital device. . . Their study, which was conducted in both the U.S. and China, shows that the effect extends to several types of virtuous behavior, from charitable giving to choosing educational reading material over page turners.

Time and Direction (03-18-22)

Beracci and Fabbri studied how time is perceived to map onto physical locations; their findings may be useful to people trying to understand research findings, for example.  The investigators report that prior research has shown that “Time is represented along a horizontal mental line with an association between the past (or short duration) and left space as well as between the future (or long duration) and right space. . . . The aim of the present study was to test the presence of a vertical representation of temporal expressions, overcoming possible methodological limits. . . .

Bias Toward What’s Expected (03-17-22)

Maister and colleagues learned how subjective our assessments of our own faces and bodies are; their findings can likely be applied in other situations in which assessments are made.  The researchers report that they “used a computational reverse-correlation technique to explore individuals’ mental ‘self-portraits’ of their faces and body shapes in an unbiased, data-driven way. . . . Self-portraits were similar to individuals’ real faces but, importantly, also contained clues to each person’s self-reported personality traits, which were reliably detected by external observers. . . . .

Vision – Taste Links (03-16-22)

Lee and Lim tie visual experiences to anticipated tastes.  They report that their “study examines the effects on viewers’ purchase intention of two visual design techniques used with food items in food advertising – repetition and alignment. . . . Three studies were conducted. . . . The findings of Study 1 and Study 2 reveal that repetition of food items enhanced viewers’ likelihood of purchasing the presented food through cross-modal responses between vision and taste. . . .  results . . . confirm . . .

Beauty and Goodness (03-15-22)

He and teammates link goodness and facial attractiveness;  it is possible that their findings can be applied more broadly.  The team report that “A well-documented ‘beauty is good’ stereotype is expressed in the expectation that physically attractive people have more positive characteristics. Recent evidence has also found that unattractive faces are associated with negative character inferences. . . This study tested the hypothesis that complementary ‘good is beautiful” and “bad is ugly” stereotypes bias aesthetic judgments. . . . this . . .

Beware of High Temperature Walks (03-14-22)

Asano and colleagues learned that walking in hot outdoor environments can harm subsequent cognitive performance indoors;  this finding supports creating more temperature controlled indoor walking areas in office complexes and similar locations.  The research team reports that “In the experiments [conducted], a total of 96 participants took a mathematical addition test in an air-conditioned room before and after walking in an actual outdoor environment.

Photo Titles (03-11-22)

Duran-Barraza and colleagues evaluated how titles influence responses to artistic photography.  They report that “Conceptual information is central to the field of artistic photography. . . . we investigated whether artist's conceptual titles affected viewers’ interest in artistic photographs. Experiment 1 showed that adding artist's conceptual titles increased both the rated liking of and interest in the photographs, whereas adding a descriptive title had no effect.

Vision- and Warning-Based Ads (03-10-22)

Shen and colleagues studied responses to different sorts of advertisements along with perceived beauty.  They report that “Using 68 standardized environmental advertisements as materials, this study examines potential differences between warning-based and vision-based environmental advertisements in the induced environment-related aesthetic perception and experience. The results show a significant difference between warning-based and vision-based advertisements in the experienced beauty . . .  with no difference in (global) aesthetic perception.

Value of Natural Light (03-09-22)

Satish, Joseph, and Nanavati recap the benefits of natural light.  They report that “Exposure to daylight, in particular, plays an outsized role in our overall well-being and mental health.  Like almost all animals, humans have a circadian cycle that regulates sleep, metabolism, heart rate, and body temperature over a 24-hour cycle.  Daylight is the main environmental stimulus that syncs the body’s internal clock with the external world. . . . Studies have shown that daylight access can reduce stress, lower blood pressure, and even improve a person’s cognitive function.” 

ADHD and Storage Requirements (03-08-22)

Researchers have identified an increased likelihood of hoarding in people with ADHD;  this finding may indicate a greater need for storage options among people with ADHD who are not hoarding.  Morein-Zamir and colleagues report that “Whilst formerly associated with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), it is now recognised that individuals with HD [hoarding disorder] often have inattention symptoms reminiscent of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Here, we investigated HD in adults with ADHD. . . .

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