Camouflage Tips (01-24-20)

Only a few designers actually develop camouflage, but learning more about camouflage generally has the potential to be handy in a number of situations/settings.  Smart, Cuthill and Scott-Samuel report in a study (done with human participants) published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B that “movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators. . . . Ioan Smart . . .  lead author, said: ‘Our research has shown. . . . Localisation can be reduced, if the moving target is unpatterned, has the mean brightness of the background, it does not use a startle display before moving, and uses short, fast movements.’” Study participants were “tasked with localising upon a target displayed on peripherally viewed computer screens.”

“Animals Should Use Short, Fast Movements to Avoid Being Located.”  2020.  Press release, University of Bristol, http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2020/january/camouflage-.html