Increase Productivity/Performance

Help Groups Remember (09-16-16)

Providing tools to help groups easily record information so they can recall it better later seems to be a good idea.  Thorley and Marion have learned via a study that will be published in Psychological Bulletin that “groups recall less than their individual members would if working alone.”  Group recall is important because “Collaborative remembering is important as it is used in a number of different everyday settings. In the workplace, interview panels jointly recall candidates’ answers before deciding whom to employ.

Benefits of TeleWork (09-07-16)

Canonico’s research indicates that the performance-related benefits of telework decrease over time.  After collected data from over 500 employees of a British organization, she determined that  “The benefits of working from home disappear over time for both employees and organisations if it is a full-time arrangement. . . . While previous studies have demonstrated that home workers are more productive than office-based workers, . . . [this study] shows that on a long term basis, there are no differences between home and office workers. The reason, according to Dr.

Envy at Work (08-26-16)

Envy in workplaces can arise for many reasons, imagined or real (consider variations in desk chairs provided).  Koopman, at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Business has found  “a strong link between an employee’s feelings of envy after they perceive a supervisor has treated them worse relative to their co-workers and the length of time by which they process this information.”  A key concept discussed by Koopman is  “epistemic motivation” (EM) –– the desire to process information thoroughly and grasp the meaning behind a particular situation. . . .

Lavender and Rosemary (08-25-16)

Lauren Bussey has studied the effects of smelling either lavender or rosemary on memory function in older adults.  Her specific research interest was “prospective memory: this can be time-based, such as remembering to do something at a certain time in the future, or event-based, such as remembering to withdraw money when walking past a bank.”   She found that “Lavender, long known for its relaxing properties, impaired time-based prospective memory; rosemary, which appeared to increase alertness, enhanced both time- and event-based prospective memory.”

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Increase Productivity/Performance