Music

Seasonal Playlists (03-07-17)

Krause and North researched how music-playlist preferences vary by time of year.  They report that “The literature concerning seasonal correlates of mood and behavior suggests that colder weather is associated with low activity and a reflective cognitive style, whereas warmer weather is associated with higher activity levels. Analyses of the season-based music-playlist preferences of 402 participants . . .

Happy Sounds, Sad Sounds (03-02-17)

Sheldon and Donahue’s work confirms that the type of music listened to influences memories recalled.  The researchers found that “if you listen to happy or peaceful music, you recall positive memories, whereas if you listen to emotionally scary or sad music, you recall largely negative memories from your past.” The Sheldon/Donahue study is published in Memory and Cognition.   More details on the study conducted: “participants had 30 seconds to listen to 32 newly composed piano pieces not known to them.

Music: Consistent Assessments by Kids and Adults (01-18-17)

Franco and his team have learned that children and adults categorize the emotional effects of music in the same ways.  This finding is important because children do not necessarily respond to sensory stimuli as adults do.  The researchers found that “novel child-directed music was presented in three conditions: instrumental, vocal-only, and song (instrumental plus vocals) to 3- to 6-year-olds previously screened for language development. . . . children chose a face expressing the emotion matching each musical track.

Young Children, Adults, and Responses to Music (12-20-16)

Franco, Chew, and Swaine report that young children and adults have similar emotional responses to music.  They state that as part of their study “novel child-directed music was presented in three conditions: instrumental, vocal-only, and song (instrumental plus vocals) to 3- to 6-year-olds.”  Music presented was categorized by the researchers as  “’happy’ (major mode/fast tempo) and ‘sad’ (minor mode/slow tempo) tracks.” Research with adults has tied feeling happy to hearing music in a major key with a fast tempo and feeling sad to hearing slow music in minor keys.  Also,  “Nonsense syllab

Music Supports Exercise (10-18-16)

Now there are even more reasons to make sure people exercising can listen to music.  Stork and Ginis “investigated the impact of listening to music during exercise on perceived enjoyment, attitudes and intentions towards sprint interval training (SIT). Twenty men . . . and women . . . unfamiliar with SIT exercise completed two acute sessions of SIT, one with and one without music. . . . Attitudes towards SIT were significantly more positive following the music than no music condition. . . .

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