Choosing or Rejecting (01-10-17)

Sokolova and Krishna learned that when people are being asked to make a selection, how that task is described makes a difference.  Their findings, which can be applied by anyone asking others to make choices, are straightforward: “People can make decisions by choosing or by rejecting alternatives. This research shows that changing a task from choice to rejection makes people more likely to rely on deliberative processing, what we label the task-type effect. . . . We show that changing a task from choice to rejection makes people express more consistent preferences between safe and risky options . . . . switching a task from choice to rejection increases the quality of consideration sets in the context of hotel reviews . . . and leads to more rational decisions in the context of cell phone plan selection.”

Tatiana Sokolova and Aradhna Krishna.  2016.  “Take It Or Leave It:  How Choosing Versus Rejecting Alternatives Affects Information Processing.”  Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 614-635.