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sensory science

More Information on Pink (12-03-14)

Genschow and his team investigated the effects of Baker-Miller pink (similar to Pepto-Bismal pink) on mood.  Their information seems to contradict previous findings that being near this color is calming.  Genschow and his fellow researchers found that “Many prisons across western countries recently began to paint detention cells in Baker-Miller pink to calm down aggressive inmates. This recent development is based on early findings . . . suggesting that Baker-Miller pink reduces physical strength and thus aggressive behavior. In the present study. . . .

Not So Far Outside the Box (12-02-14)

Chan, Dow, and Schunn investigated how sources of inspiration influence design solution creativity.  They report that “Design ideas often come from sources of inspiration (e.g., analogous designs, prior experiences). . . . we test the popular but unevenly supported hypothesis that conceptually distant sources of inspiration provide the best insights for creative production. Through text analysis of hundreds of design concepts across a dozen different design challenges on a Web-based innovation platform that tracks connections to sources of inspiration, we find that . . .

Perils of Approaching (12-01-14)

Yanping Tu, and colleagues Christopher Hsee, Zoe Lu, and Bowen Ruan, recently completed research indicating that people may not be positive toward individuals and things that seem to be approaching them.  As reported, “people feel more negative toward individuals, images, and sounds if those ‘stimuli’ are perceived to be approaching them.  This aversion has cautionary implications for public speakers who like to get close to their audience as well as for marketers who zoom in on products.”  It seems likely that some of the effects seen are related to perceived invasions of pe

Insights on Healthcare Signage (11-26-14)

At the Healthcare Design Conference in San Diego, Farrington and Garbier, a signage design expert and a landscape architect, respectively (both with several decades of experience), shared insights on effective signage for healthcare facilities.  They reminded practitioners to make sure that signage at their facility aligns with GPS and Google maps information visitors will receive.  If Google maps will be telling people to turn right, signage should not suggest that they turn left, for example, even if both turns will ultimately guide travelers to the same destination.  Signa

Jazz It Up! (11-25-14)

Recent research with people putting golf balls can logically be extended to individuals engaged in other similar activities – while boosting a few holiday golf games!  Baghurst and his colleagues investigated “the benefit of music in [a] fine motor control situation,” i.e., while people are putting golf balls.  All study participants putted while listening to, in a random order, “no music or classical, country, rock, jazz, and hip hop/rap.”  The researchers found that “With the exception of rock music, participants performed significantly better in all musical trials compared

New Insights on Virtual Reality (11-24-14)

New research indicates that virtual reality experiences may be significantly different from physical ones.  A related press release issued by UCLA reports that “UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes.

Bonding Via Nostalgia (11-21-14)

It seems there are some real benefits to thinking about nostalgic group events; those sentimental thoughts generally strengthen relationships among teammates.  Wildschut and his colleagues learned that individuals “who reflected on a nostalgic event they had experienced together with [other] group members . . . evaluated [their] group more positively and reported stronger intentions” to associate with group members than people who “recalled a nostalgic event they had experienced individually . . . those who reflected on a lucky event they had experienced together with . .

Paying for Green In China (11-20-14)

Hu and his colleagues investigated the willingness of home shoppers in China to pay for green construction. Their work revealed “that the socio-economic status of homebuyers determines their willingness to pay for green attributes. Only the rich are prepared to pay for green apartments to improve their living comfort. To all, the notion of health is appealing as consumers are willing to pay for an unpolluted environment and for non-toxic construction materials used in buildings in good locations.”

Jazz It Up! (11-19-14)

Recent research with people putting golf balls can logically be extended to individuals engaged in other similar activities – while boosting a few holiday golf games!  Baghurst and his colleagues investigated “the benefit of music in [a] fine motor control situation,” i.e., while people are putting golf balls.  All study participants putted while listening to, in a random order, “no music or classical, country, rock, jazz, and hip hop/rap.”  The researchers found that “With the exception of rock music, participants performed significantly better in all musical trials compared

What Do Pediatric Patients Want? (11-18-14)

During the programming phase for an addition to the Nemours Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children in Delaware, pediatric patients were asked what sorts of features they’d like to see in the new facility.  Some of their responses are intriguing: “Those ideas included a roller coaster and a swimming pool, for starters. But most of all, they asked for solutions that would make the building itself less scary and would better accommodate their families over what might be a long stay. . . .