Research Design Connections

National Culture and Workplace Design (02-22-17)

Grenness’ work indicates the importance of aligning national culture and workplace design.  He reports on research done with Telenor, a Norwegian firm.  In Norway, an open-plan, flexible workplace, that reflected the country’s egalitarian social structure worked well.  This was not the case in areas in Asia.  Regarding the design of its offices outside Norway, Grenness reports that “Based on the interviews, it was fairly obvious that Telenor had not given the issue [of alignment with national culture] much thought.  Its overall strategy was to copy the design of its head office in Norway .

Innovation/Creativity and Workplace Design (02-21-17)

Blakey investigated links between workspace design and innovation/creativity.  Knowledge workers living in California were asked how they felt workplace design influenced their innovation/creativity.  Blakey found via surveys and interviews that “Within the individual workspace technology surfaced as a primary driver of innovation. When asked about team workspace respondents [indicated] concern over noise and interruptions. . .

Millennials and Values Gaps (02-20-17)

LoMonaco-Benzing and Ha-Brookshire, in a study published in Sustainability, investigated links between Millennials’ decisions to leave firms and gaps they identified between their employers’ stated values and actions.  The researchers found that “one reason young workers choose to leave a firm is because they find a disconnect between their beliefs and the culture they observe in the workplace.

Light Color and Mental Effort Intensity (02-17-17)

Lasauskaite and Cajochen linked mental effort intensity and light color.  The team “tested effort-related cardiac response under four lighting conditions and found that it decreased with color temperatures [i.e., as light got bluer].  Thus, blue-enriched light in offices and schools might . . . preserve resources during cognitive activities.”

Ruta Lasauskaite and Christian Cajochen.  2016.  “Influence of Lighting Color Temperature on Mental Effort.”  Psychology of Architecture Conference (December 4-5, Austin, TX) Program, p. 26.

Encouraging Greenness (02-16-17)

Unsworth and McNeill set out to learn more about how to encourage people to behave in an environmentally responsible way.  They found that self-interest can be used to motivate green actions.  The researchers determined that attempts to encourage earth-friendly behaviors are likely to be more successful when the green behaviors are linked to “goals that are important to people, even if such goals are unrelated to climate change or the environment in general. . . .

Airflow Velocity and Sleeping (02-15-17)

Airflow velocity in a space influences how well we sleep there.  Morito and her team found that  “a higher air velocity of airflow disturbed human sleep more than a lower air velocity of airflow. . . . The mean air temperature, relative humidity, and mean radiant temperature in the rooms with both air conditioners were 26.4 . . . °C, 58 . . . %, and 26.3 . . . °C, and 26.4 . . . °C, 53 . . .  %, and 26.1 . . . °C for [A] and [B], respectively. The average . . . velocity of airflow was actually 0.14 . . . m/s and 0.04 . . . m/s for [A] and [B], respectively. . . .

Curved Contours, Sharp Contours, Responses (02-14-17)

Pati and colleagues investigated responses to curved and sharp contours in healthcare environments and gathered some intriguing data.  The team report that “Recent studies in cognitive neuroscience suggest that humans prefer objects with a curved contour compared with objects that have pointed features and a sharp-angled contour.”  During their study  “subjects (representing three age-groups and both sexes) were exposed to a randomized order of 312 real-life images (objects, interiors, exteriors, landscape, and a set of control images).

Restorative Break Rooms (02-13-17)

Nejati, Rodiek, and Shepley studied surgical nurses’ ideas about what makes break rooms restorative spaces using visual simulations.  They “assess[ed] the restorative potential of specific design features in hospital staff break areas, investigating nature-related indoor decor, daylight, window views, and direct access to outdoor environments.”  The Nejati team found that when “On a scale of 1–10, nurses evaluated the restorative qualities of (a) direct access to the outdoors through a balcony, (b) an outdoor view through a window, (c) a nature artwork, and (d) an indoor plant, all depicted

Sitting Up Straight: Benefits (02-10-17)

Research by Wilkes and colleagues confirms the psychological benefits of seats that encourage sitting with good posture.  As the investigators report, research has generally shown that “upright posture improves self-esteem and mood in [psychologically] healthy samples.”  Wilkes and her team studied a group of people “with mild to moderate depression.” Some study participants were asked to sit with good posture and others were not. The researchers found that “The postural manipulation significantly improved posture and increased high arousal positive affect. . . .

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Research Conversations

During too many meetings, whatever people have gathered to do just doesn’t get accomplished.  Science-informed design of meeting rooms can change that and make group gatherings more effective.
 

Reflected Façades

Façades are more than just skins that surround a structure.  Their design influences the thoughts and behaviors of viewers, sometimes without their knowledge.  Cognitive science research can be used to make it more likely that the designs of façades send chosen messages and encourage desired behaviors, inside and out.
 

Times Square

When people move, they burn off calories.  Slimming our waistlines isn’t all that moving does for us, however.  Research consistently shows, for example, that when we’re walking we think more clearly, creatively and productively (whether inside or outdoors), and get along better with others.
 

How do you decide what to name places, products, and projects? Do you consider how those names sound, for example?  Cognitive scientists spend a lot of time thinking about the implications of the letters and sounds in names.

PlaceCoach News Briefs

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Book Reviews

Digial Futures Bookcover

Insights on creating cities that support residents, visitors, and their technologies

Useful information that can be applied to create a world where more can prosper

Design at Work

PetBathroom

Pets traveling through the San Antonio airport, and their owners, are no doubt thrilled by its pet relief areas.